1. point: 1 of 10

    The Emerald Necklace Tour begins at the Longwood Bridge, west of the LMA past the Riverway near Temple Isreal. For real time turn by turn directions to the selected Point, use the Google Maps app link (mobile only). 

     

    Below the Longwood Bridge, the Riverway (a part of the Emerald Necklace) serves as the boundary between Boston and Brookline and boasts 34 acres of hiking and bicycle paths that meander along the Muddy River. Home to over 100,000 plantings, the park has many picturesque stone bridges including at Chapel St. and Longwood Ave. Throughout almost twenty years of work on the Emerald Necklace (1878-1896), Frederick Law Olmsted created special retreats — places for both active and passive recreation; green and open spaces offering relief and refreshment from the pressures and tensions of everyday life. Olmsted's work changed the landscape of America through such projects as New York City's Central Park and the U.S. Capitol grounds.
     

    When ready to proceed on the Tour, tap 'Next Point.' To return to the Tour Overview, tap 'Back to Tour.'

    Address:

    Longwood Ave and Riverway

    42.34035237853955, -71.11016384113918
    122
  2. point: 2 of 10

    The Green Line T Stop for Longwood provides a handicapped accessible ramp connection to the historic Emerald Necklace.

    Downtown is a twenty minute ride by rail. 

    Address:

    Chapel St north of Longwood Ave

    42.34161799106902, -71.11028722275387
    113
  3. point: 3 of 10

    The Bridge is located next to a stone gazebo "round house" and spans both a historic bridle path and the Muddy River all created by the father of American landscape architecture, Frederick Law Olmsted in the late 1800s as part of Boston's beloved Emerald Necklace. 

    Address:

    Riverway and Short Street

    42.34215723785539, -71.10878518570553
    103
  4. point: 4 of 10

    The 120,000 square football field was named in honor of the legendary Hall of Fame baseball player and humanitarian. In 2009, Emmanuel College and the Yawkey Foundation, in partnership with the city of Boston, contributed $4 million to restore the historic, city-owned Roberto Clemente Field, an important community athletic resource in the Back Bay Fens, across the street from Emmanuel's campus. This complex now features an NCAA-regulation synthetic turf field, which accommodates regulation softball, soccer and lacrosse, and  serves as the practice field for Boston Latin School’s football team. The rubberized track  remains open to the public for recreational walking and jogging year-round. 

    Address:

    Near Park Drive and Kilmarnock

    42.34065050730136, -71.09850696076046
    104
  5. point: 5 of 10

    The Kelleher Rose Garden sits just behind a hedge in the Back Bay Fens and greets visitors with a dazzling display of more than 1,500 roses representing 200 different varieties along its garden paths and trellises. Adding to the drama is a reconstructed 1930’s-era fountain encircled by statuary.

    42.34184003442351, -71.09530976761471
    105
  6. point: 6 of 10

    Cultivated during WWII to ease demand on the food supply, it is one of the last continually operating Victory Gardens in existence today and the oldest remaining wartime 'Victory Garden.' Today it is a well-loved community garden situated in the Back Bay Fens section of the Emerald Necklace. In order to get a plot, you must be a Boston resident and have volunteered. In total, the  7.5-acre area has over 500 gardens.

     

    Note: The Victory Gardens are beyond this guided Emerald Necklace tour loop. Keep walking along Park Drive for two minutes (about 400 feet) to reach them.

    42.34305729388059, -71.09442732084881
    106
  7. point: 7 of 10

    Within the Fens, the Shattuck Visitor Center, originally designed by renowned U.S. architect H. H. Richardson as a pump station to control water flow in the Back Bay Fens, now serves as the headquarters of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy. The Emerald Necklace is a National Landmark designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. In its entirety, the Necklace includes 1,200 acres. Stretching from Back Bay to Dorchester, these inviting green spaces connect people and nature, just as Olmsted intended when he designed it more than 120 years ago. Today, the six parks under the Emerald Necklace Conservancy’s stewardship offer a range of experiences from quiet time on a shaded bench to recreational activities like sailing, hiking, golf, or softball.

    Address:

    125 The Fenway

    42.34141050891174, -71.09230935573578
    107
  8. point: 8 of 10

    One of the largest art museums in the U.S., the original MFA opened its doors to the public on July 4, 1876, the nation’s centennial. Today the MFA is one of the most comprehensive art museums in the world; the collection encompasses nearly 500,000 works of art and receives over 1.1 million visitors annually. The building is a large scale example of neo-classical architecture. Its Fenway entrance is flanked by sculptures by Antonio Lopez Garcia called 'Day and Night' featuring two monumental (10’) baby heads.

    Address:

    465 Huntington Ave

    42.34046018087344, -71.0948591565002
    108
  9. point: 9 of 10

    Evans Way Park is an original carriageway entrance designed for - but not as part of - the historic Emerald Necklace, a designated Boston Historic Landmark. The park sits between MassArt's high rise Tower Building, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and Wentworth Institute of Technology's dormitories. The park is a popular spot for students, museum visitors, and the community. 

    Address:

    244 Fenway

    42.33887410490338, -71.09794906128536
    114
  10. point: 10 of 10

    The Muddy River "daylighting" project (2017) re-opened parts of the river that have been covered over the years, installed larger culverts to improve water flow, and made other habitat and landscape improvements to the parklands surrounding the river between the Riverway and Avenue Louis Pasteur.  The naming of the parkland honors the late Justine M. Liff, who served as Boston Parks and Recreation Commissioner from 1996 until her untimely passing in 2002. The project has successfully reconnected the Riverway to the Back Bay Fens section of Boston's historic Emerald Necklace.

    42.3426746725192, -71.10323569525372
    119

Emerald Necklace

distance: More than a mile
points: 10
type: Green space/Plaza

You will tour the landmark Emerald Necklace designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Discover historic sites and hidden areas of the bucolic landmark while learning about the Park's past and present (2.5 miles). 

 

The Emerald Necklace Tour begins at the Longwood Bridge, west of the LMA past the Riverway near Temple Isreal. For real time turn by turn directions to the selected Point, use the Google Maps app link (mobile only). 

 

Tell us about your walking experience! walkingtours@longwoodarea.org

Partially accessible(more information)

You will tour the landmark Emerald Necklace designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Discover historic sites and hidden areas of the bucolic landmark while learning about the Park's past and present (2.5 miles). 

 

The Emerald Necklace Tour begins at the Longwood Bridge, west of the LMA past the Riverway near Temple Isreal. For real time turn by turn directions to the selected Point, use the Google Maps app link (mobile only). 

 

Tell us about your walking experience! walkingtours@longwoodarea.org